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Are Yoni Eggs Good or Bad for Me?

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When it comes to yoni eggs, there are a lot of facts and fiction out there. We’ve received great questions from many of you so we collected them to provide answers based on available research.

The Bloomi supports healthy, organic, non-toxic, and holistic sexual health products for women. We never endorse products that are dangerous (there is currently no proven evidence the yoni egg is harmful) and aim to give you credible information to let you be the CEO of your own body. Yoni eggs have a lengthy history of being used for sexual, emotional and spiritual wellness of women. While the yoni egg is still new in the Western world, it has huge following with many reporting significant emotional and physical benefits.

The following covers the answers to your most common questions. We hope you feel informed and more confident in your yoni egg decisions. 

Yoni eggs originated from ancient Taoist traditions

Yoni eggs have been in the press more than usual after Dr. Jen Gunter, an OB-GYN and blogger, made strong allegations against GOOP for selling jade yoni eggs and not doing enough credible research to back up their claims. 

It’s been established that yoni eggs are sensual tools that women have used to improve their sexual health for centuries with both physical and spiritual benefits. Taoist experts and authors of The Multi-Orgasmic Woman, Dr. Rachel Carlton and Mantak Chia, do a great job in their book explaining how ‘holistic’ healing takes place at a physical, emotional and spiritual level. Sexual energy specifically, is called out as a particularly potent force for overall health and healing. They walk readers through exercises recommended to achieve optimal sexual energy, including yoni egg practice (referred to as Jade Egg practice).[i]

When used regularly (and correctly) for pelvic floor exercises, yoni eggs can also improve your sex life. One study among women with weak pelvic floors and incontinence found those who were trained in pelvic floor exercises (biofeedback devices) noticed increases in both desire and ease of orgasm[ii].

Experts have mixed opinions about them

Yoni eggs are not for everyone and this is partly why you will see mixed support in the field. We offer three expert opinions to consider: an OB/GYN, a Physical Therapist and a Sexuality Coach, all of whom specialize on the pelvic floor.

Dr. Layla Martin, has a PhD and is a sexuality coach and who specializes in Tantric and Taoist traditions. As stated in her blog, she supports the use of yoni eggs, as long as they are used and cleaned properly: “Ultimately, this backlash was about sexually shaming a woman for sharing her personal experience.” Jade eggs, used hygienically and properly, have been shown to have incredible health results, both physiologically and psychologically[iii].

However, Dr. Rachel Gelman, a licensed Physical Therapist and member of the International Society of Women’s Sexual Health (ISSWSH) says “most patients and the general population have hypertonic (overactive) pelvic floor muscles and need to focus on relaxing rather than strengthening.” She encourages people to see a provider before they start Kegels to make sure 1) they are appropriate 2) see if they can do them correctly 3) get an individualized exercise plan.

Dr. Debra Wickman, MD, a licensed OB-GYN and also a member of ISSWSH and the American Society of Educators, Counselors and Therapists (AASECT), on the other hand, also supports the use of yoni eggs, says “It’s much less effective for women to exercise their pelvic floors well without feedback from an object inside the vagina. The jade egg provides this, and much more”. Additionally, she explains that many women are reluctant to touch their vulva or vaginal area so this practice helps with that, “Women who in the past were reluctant to touch or view their genitals, push past those barriers and witness their bodies change as they tune into sensations and responses elicited by the jade egg practice. With connection like this, healing follows—both physical and psychological. Intentional focus brings about physical change”.

Quality crystals are not porous like rocks in your backyard

Quality Jade, Rose Quartz or Obsidian stones are NOT like regular rocks you find in your backyard. The notion that they are all rocks and equally porous is incorrect. For example, a study published in American Mineralogist in 2006, found that a specimen of quartz has 0.39% porosity as opposed to a typical rock which has 15-20% porosity. Some experts would say this still means yoni egg crystals can be slightly porous, which is correct. However, consider all the things you put in your vagina that are far more porous and bacteria-laden and are not sanitized before insertion… penises, hands, etc. 

With that said, yoni eggs users should become educated on best practices for keeping their yoni egg clean. To keep your egg sanitized, manufacturers recommend soaking your egg in room temperature water with a few drops of tea tree and lavender essential oils (known for their antibacterial properties) for 20 minutes. After each use, wash your yoni egg with mild soap and water and if using a drilled egg, ensure the hole is cleaned as well. You can read more instructions here.

As a best practice, also avoid using your yoni egg when you are menstruating, having sex or have an infection. It’s also good to avoid them during pregnancy.

There are no reported cases of Toxic Shock Syndrome from yoni egg use

There are currently no reported cases of yoni eggs causing Toxic Shock Syndrome (TSS). It is also important to note that yoni eggs are NOT absorbent like tampons. 

Absorbent tampons were found to contain toxic ingredients that were the major culprit causing TSS, especially among young women in the US. The FDA stepped in and implemented changes in the tampon industry to make them safer: in 1985 Polyacrylate was banned and in 1990, FDA standardized absorbency labeling requirements. Thanks to stricter regulations, cases of TSS dropped significantly, more than 90%, from 1980 to 1996.[iv] To not have any reported cases linked to yoni egg use is quite remarkable. 

Selecting a crystal can be a fun exercise 

Great question! With all the hype around yoni eggs, we have seen an increase in questionable companies who are offering crystals of unknown origin or made with unsafe or mixed materials. 

La Treta, a holistic health advocate and yoni user, informs her audience that yoni eggs are ‘NOT inherently dangerous or toxic’ but some of the misconceptions come from not understanding which crystals are safe for insertion. Crystals should be able to withstand body heat, moisture and excessive cleaning safety[v]. Here is a (short) list of ‘safe’ crystals suitable for yoni egg practices:

For the full list of crystals not recommend, you can find them here.[vi] Additionally, we recommend you do research on the company selling the crystals. Are they ensuring the quality of their crystal? Do they ensure the stones have closed porosity (or close to closed) to prevent bacteria from seeping into the surface?  

Consumers should make sure the manufacturer deems the crystal yoni eggs safe for internal use, does not use dyes or glues and does not incorporate radiation in their manufacturing process. Of note, the Bloomi screens yoni eggs for these and other criteria to ensure we only carry quality brands in our e-marketplace.

The first time you insert a yoni egg, it may be awkward. Here are some tips

If you are experiencing pain, discomfort or anxiety with using a yoni egg, it may not be right for you, or not the right time to use one at this stage in your life. See information in Question #2 above in regards to hypertonic muscles.

If you feel the yoni egg is a good option for you but need tips to insert it more comfortably, here are a few best practices:

  • Warm the egg on your belly before insertion to bring it to body temperature
  • As Dr. Abrams suggest in her book, The Multi Orgasmic Woman, “it is a good idea to do this exercise after your sexual energy has already been awakened and your sexual secretions have already begun to flow”, aka turn yourself on or use lubrication.
  • Relax by taking a few deep breaths.
  • Don’t feel rushed. Make sure you have adequate privacy and time
  • Get comfortable. Practice yoni egg exercises naked or in a warm robe.
  • Don’t worry about dropping it. Set up a towel or rug under you in case you drop your egg.

You should not sleep with your yoni egg

Most yoni egg experts recommend doing 5-20 minutes of exercises. Do not use a yoni egg overnight as they can overwork the muscles and it is not safe.

No, the yoni egg won’t get stuck in your vagina

Think of your vagina as a closed cul-de-sac. Just like tampons, Nuva rings or menstrual cups cannot get stuck, neither will your yoni egg.

With that said, new users can sometimes feel tense or worried their egg will be difficult to remove. In these cases, try a drilled yoni egg that allows you to tie a string for easier removal. Take a few deep breaths and try to relax your muscles when you are getting ready to remove the egg. Most American women grow up in a culture where they are not accustomed to touching their genitals or using their fingers inside the vagina. Getting to know your body and touching yourself is healthy. It is perfectly fine to reach in to pull your egg out. You can also spread your legs and squat to ‘bear down’ and push the yoni egg out gently. 

Have more questions? Email us at info@thebloomi.com. Our team of sexuality experts and researchers will work to make sure we answer all your questions honestly.

 

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[i] Mantak, C., Abrams, R.. (2005). The Multi-Orgasmic Woman.

[ii] N.K. Beji, O. Yalcin, and H.A. Erkan, The Effect of Pelvic Floor Training on Sexual Function of Treated Patients. International Urogynecological Journal. 14, No 4 (2003): 234-38.

[iii] http://saidadesilets.com/gwyneth-paltrow-why-doctors-research-say-jade-eggs-are-safe/

[iv] Centers for Disease Control: https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/5/6/99-0611_article

[v] Chakrubs.com; Yoni Eggs are Dangerous and Toxic: A Guide to Choosing Your Next Yoni Egg: https://medium.com/@latetramo/yoni-eggs-are-dangerous-and-toxic-a-practical-guide-to-choosing-your-next-yoni-egg-wisely-c2bf1d55460f

[vi] https://medium.com/@latetramo/yoni-eggs-are-dangerous-and-toxic-a-practical-guide-to-choosing-your-next-yoni-egg-wisely-c2bf1d55460f

 

Note: This is not medical advice and we recommend you speak with your doctor if you have any questions. If you have an IUD or are pregnant, also consult with your doctor before using a yoni egg.